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IL5 Technical Data

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 IL5L, IL5S, IL5H, and IL5Q


bluedotFour models: from L: 800 x 600, to Q: 2560 x 2048

 

bluedotAdvanced 5-Megapixel CMOS sensor

 

bluedotMultiple recording modes to suit any situation


bluedotCamera control via built-in web interface or

   FasMotion PC/Mac application


bluedotLong Record Option: Stream video directly to an SSD

1IL5Front_640x425
1IL5Front_640x425
2IL3 Side
3IL3 SD Card
4IL3 USB
5IL3 GigE

 

Standard Record Mode: Classic High-Speed Imaging The IL5H records beautifully sharp 1920 x 1080 video at 634 frames per second, while the IL5Q records amazing 2560 x 1440 video at 359fps, in vivid color or monochrome. Smaller resolutions may be recorded at faster frame rates: 720p @ 1400fps, 800 x 600 @ 1677fps, etc. Binning and sub-sampling features of the sensor give the IL5 great flexibility and sensitivity.

 

Flexible Control The IL5 can be controlled over Gigabit Ethernet via Fastec FasMotion software on your PC/Mac or via the built-in web interface with your favorite web browser on your PC, Mac, tablet, or even your smartphone.

 

Long Record OptionWith recording speeds of over 200 frames per second at HD 1080p resolution and 1562 fps at VGA resolution to the built-in SSD, the Fastec IL5 lets you see what you have been missing with normal-speed video. Unlike traditional high-speed camera systems that only record for a few seconds and require careful triggering, the Fastec IL5 with LR option can record at high speed for many minutes at high resolutions, to many hours at reduced resolutions.

 

FasFire Mode – Ultra-fast save times to an SSD or SD card while recording high-speed bursts of hundreds or even thousands of images at a time, the IL5 is always ready for the next highspeed snapshot!

 

FasCorder Mode – Operate the camera as you would a common camcorder! This intuitive Long Record feature allows you to record and pause as needed to follow the action, stop recording and review what you have, and then append additional footage at will, even after a power cycle. Choose between Record on Command (ROC), which records varying length clips, or Burst Record on Command (BROC), which records fixed-length clips. In Playback, all of the recordings are browsable on the timeline. You may play or scrub through them continuously or jump to the beginning of each, making it easy to find the footage you wish to view.

 

Multiple Storage Options - The IL5 features both a USB port and an SD port for quick and easy image downloads to USB flash drives, SD cards, or portable hard drives. The optional built-in SSD (solid state drive) provides up to 1TB of lightning-fast non-volatile internal storage.
 
High-Performance Image Transfer - FasMotion camera control, running on a PC or Mac makes workflow a breeze with image transfer rates of up to 90MB/sec, depending on image size, file type, and computer performance.
 
 

Datasheet

 

Compact Size - 63mm H x 63mm W x 65mm D and .28 kg

 
Camera Specifications
SENSOR 12-bit 5MP CMOS sensor with 5μm square pixels, color or monochrome
SENSOR MODES Standard; binning 2x2, 4x4; sub-sampling 2x2, 4x4; combination 2x bin + 2x sub
RESOLUTION BY MODEL IL5-Q: QSXGA 2560 x 2048; -H: HD 1920x1080; -S: SXGA 1280x1024; -L SVGA 800x600
LIGHT SENSITIVITY 1600 to 12,800* ISO monochrome, 800 to 6400* ISO color (depending on mode)
SHUTTER Global electronic shutter from 3μsec to 41.654ms
IMAGE MEMORY
4GB (std.) or 8GB (optional)
BUILT-IN STORAGE SDHC SD card (32GB maximum), USB flash drive
FILE FORMATS Stacks – BMP, DNG, JPEG, TIFF, Tiff(raw); Video – AVI, CAP(raw); Still – JPEG
LENS MOUNT C-mount (std.), F-mount or PL-mount (optional)
COMMUNICATION PORTS USB 2.0 device (micro-B), Ethernet (10/100/1000Base-T)
CONTROL SOFTWARE FasMotion (PC/Mac application), web interface (browser on all platforms)
SIX EXTERNAL I/O PORTS Markers, Trigger In/Out, Sync In/Out, Arm In/Out (LVTTL (3.3V) or switch closure)
MARKER DATA VIEWS FasMotion playback timeline and o-scope mode, XML file
VIDEO OUT HDMI (1080p30, 1080p60, 720p, 480p)
CONSTRUCTION Anodized machined aluminum housing
POWER 10-26v @ 22W (max). Universal power supply included
OPERATING ENVIRONMENT +5°C TO +50°C
SIZE & WEIGHT 184mm W x 112mm H x 40mm D. 1Kg (2.2 lbs.).
Optional Features
WiFi 802.11 b/g/n, security: open, WEP, WPA(2) - PSK
BUILT-IN STORAGE Solid State Drive (SSD): 250GB, 512GB, 1TB
LONG RECORD Streams uncompressed video to SSD at 480MB/sec; 8GB mem. + SSD required

RecordTable IL5

 

TS5/IL5 Video Gallery

 

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ABOUT HIGH-SPEED DIGITAL VIDEO CAMERAS

What are High-Speed Digital Video Cameras?
Why Use High-Speed Digital Video Cameras?
What are the Advantages of High-Speed  Digital Video Cameras?
Who Uses High-Speed Digital Video Cameras?
What Is It Used For?
What Are The Technical Considerations?

What are High-Speed Digital Video Cameras?
High-speed digital video cameras can be used as a diagnostic tool that helps engineers and researchers analyze high-speed processes. It captures a sequential series of images that are recorded at very high frame rates and played back in slow-motion to allow the viewer to see, measure and understand events that happen too fast to see with the unaided eye. High-speed video is simply the technique of recording an event at a high frame rate and playing the images back at a much slower rate, thus slowing down the event so you can actually see what’s happening.

High-speed video can help you understand your unique motion analysis applications. Whether your work involves product design, research, machinery maintenance, or biomechanics, ultra high-speed video can become one of the most important tools at your disposal. The world moves much too quickly to catch it all with our own eyes.

If you use ultra high-speed video cameras instead of standard camcorders to capture motion sequences at hundreds or thousands of frames per second, you can see the detail that occurs within that high-speed event. At 500 frames per second, you get nearly 17 images for every one that would be captured by standard (30 fps) video. And at 3,000 frames per second, you have 100 images for each standard video frame. With high-speed video, you can view important high-speed applications in a manner that allows for a meaningful analysis of that event. And if you capture a motion sequence at 500 fps and view it at 30 fps, you see a smooth, continuous motion. High-speed video gives you a better understanding of the actual motion you are studying. With high-speed video, problems can now be seen and solved.
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Why Use High-Speed Video Cameras?

Understanding high-speed motion is absolutely critical in today's fast-paced manufacturing and research environments. Using high-speed video is one of the easiest and most cost effective ways to achieve this important information.

Standard camcorders can only record at 30 frames per second, and as a result, usually miss most of the action in fast-moving events. However, if we use high-speed cameras to record these events at hundreds or even thousands of frames per second, it is a different story. When we play the images back in slow motion, or even stop and examine a single frame, we can see details that go unnoticed at normal speed.

We can learn a great deal about motion sequences if we record them with high-speed video cameras and then study the recordings in slow motion – or even as individual frames. We’ve all seen the slow motion images of automobile crash testing on TV commercials that illustrate seat belt safety or airbag inflation. Trying to capture and view these images at 30 fps would have far less impact and would be difficult, if not impossible, to analyze in any meaningful way.


As noted above, frame rate is the number or frequency of images taken, measured in images per second. Standard NTSC video (camcorders) is 30 frames per second. Shutter speed is the duration of exposure for the image, usually measured in hundredths or thousandths of a second.
A high shutter speed does not necessarily equal a high sample or frame rate. Most consumer camcorders offer high-speed shutter capability for their 30 frame per second record rates. It is possible to have 30 samples each taken at 1/2,000 of a second exposure rate. For example, if on a high-speed packaging line one package fills the field of view and if 60 packages move through the field of view in one second, the standard camera will only record, “see,” every second package.
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What are the Advantages of High-Speed Video Cameras?
While it’s possible to use standard video equipment to record and analyze motion, there are limitations to this technology:

The sampling rate of 30 frames per second (standard NTSC video) is too slow for most motion problems. Many high-speed activities occur within 100 milliseconds, 1/10 of a second. With standard 30 fps video we are only able to capture one image every 33 milliseconds. In an event that occurs within 100 milliseconds, standard video would provide a user with approximately three frames of information. With a high-speed video camera recording at 1,000 fps, the user would be able to view 100 frames of that same event.


A motion sequence recorded at 30 frames per second and slowed down by a factor of ten allows us to view it at 3 frames per second. The resulting image is very “jerky” and therefore extremely difficult to analyze with any accuracy or in meaningful detail. This is extremely important when a critical understanding of motion is crucial to your success.

Who Uses High-Speed Video Cameras?

Industries where high-speed video is solving a wide range of problems include:

Aerospace program Paper products
Appliances Personal care products
Automotive Petroleum products
Beverages Pharmaceuticals
Can manufacturing Plastics
Chemicals Printing and publishing
Computer & office products Research facilities
Electronic components Rubber products
Food processing Switches and controls
Household products Sporting goods
Machine tools Test instruments
Medical devices Textiles
Metal stamping Universities
Motors and engines
Munitions
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What Is It Used For?
Although every high-speed application is at least a little unique, high-speed video applications generally fall into four broad functional areas: Equipment Design, Testing, Research, and Production. These categories cut across industry lines and include dozens of specific applications.

Equipment Design
New mechanism design
Equipment modification
Pre-shipment shakedown

Research
Biology
Combustion
Biomechanics
Fluid dynamics
Wind tunnel

Testing
Materials testing
- Fracture
- Penetration
- Impact
- Vendor certification
Assembly and component testing
- Vibration
- Shock
- Stress

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Production
Equipment setup and changeovers
Full capacity characterization
Predictive maintenance
Machinery diagnostics
General troubleshooting
Maintenance and repair

 

What Are The Technical Considerations?
The very first thing anyone should look at when thinking about high-speed video is “what speed is necessary?” Common questions to keep in mind are "How fast do I need?" and "How fast is too fast?"

After speed is determined, the next item to be considered is the resolution of the image. If storage space is a concern, then the smallest resolution that works for the application should be chosen. If storage space is not an issue, than higher resolutions can be used. However, there will be a lot of wasted data generated from this practice. The idea of "more is better" is not always true when other variables are considered.

Now that the necessary speed and resolution choices have been made for the application, the next choice will be between the type of camera and type of control interface required. The speed and resolution choices will determine a range of cameras, but the type of interface also plays a role in this choice. Will you be working in a lab where you can interface the camera to a computer full-time, or will you be in a factory or out in the field, where simplicity and portability are key requirements?

In summary:
• Know your application — the biggest and fastest is not always required
• Know how you want to interface with your system
• Storage requirements
• Portability
• Speed

Make sure all components of the solution will be compatible.

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Fastec manufactures portable, point and shoot digital video cameras for motion analysis in plant maintenance and field service troubleshooting, research, military test and instrumentation and sports training.